Blog Tour (Book Review): The Secret Garden on 81st Street – Ivy Noelle Weir, Amber Padilla (Illustrator)

Hello!

Today I am delighted to be reviewing The Secret Garden on 81st Street by Ivy Noelle Weir & Amber Padilla as part of the TBR & Beyond Blog Tour. You can find the schedule for the tour HERE, so please do check out the other stops on the tour and hopefully we can tempt you to pick up this wonderful book.

Disclaimer – I received a copy in exchange for an honest review, all thoughts are my own.

Book Summary:

The Secret Garden with a twist: in this follow-up to Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy, this full-color graphic novel moves Mary Lennox to a New York City brownstone, where she and her very first group of friends restore an abandoned rooftop garden…and her uncle’s heart.

Mary Lennox is a loner living in Silicon Valley. With her parents always working, video game and tech become her main source of entertainment and “friends.” When her parents pass away in a tragic accident, she moves to New York City to live with her uncle who she barely knows, and to her surprise, keeps a gadget free home. Looking for comfort in this strange, new reality, Mary discovers an abandoned rooftop garden and an even bigger secret…her cousin who suffers from anxiety. With the help of her new friends, Colin and Dickon, Mary works to restore the garden to its former glory while also learning to grieve, build real friendships, and grow.

Continue reading “Blog Tour (Book Review): The Secret Garden on 81st Street – Ivy Noelle Weir, Amber Padilla (Illustrator)”

Mini Reviews

Hello!

TodayI’m here with a selection of smaller reviews from netgalley reads over the last couple of months, which are mostly fantasy, with a few others mixed in.

Disclaimer: I received an e-arc of these books from netgalley in exchange for an honest review

*** *** ***

Burying the Dead: An Archaeological History of Burial Grounds, Graveyards & Cemeteries – Lorraine Evans

Genre: Non-Fiction | History

Book Summary:

Deep in the heart of North Yorkshire, at a place called Walkington Wold, there lies a rather unusual burial ground, an Anglo-Saxon execution cemetery. Twelve skeletons were unearthed by archaeologists, ten without skulls, later examination of the skeletons revealed that their owners were all subjected to judicial execution by decapitation, one of which required several blows.

Similar fates have befallen other wretched souls, the undignified burial of suicides – in the Middle Ages, the most profound of sins – and the desecration of their bodies, go largely unrecorded. Whilst plague pits, vast cemeteries where victims of the Black Death were tossed into the ground, their bodies festering one on top of another, are only today betraying their secrets.

Although unpalatable to some, these burial grounds are an important part of our social heritage. They have been fashioned as much by the people who founded and used them, as by the buildings, gravestones and other features which they contain. They are records of social change; the symbols engraved upon individual memorials convey a sense of inherent belief systems, as they were constructed, adapted or abandoned depending on people’s needs.

Burying the Dead explores how these attitudes, practices and beliefs about death have undergone continual change. By studying the development of society’s funerary spaces, the author will reveal how we continue to reinforce our relationships with the dead, in a constant and on-going effort to maintain a bond with them.

Continue reading “Mini Reviews”

Mini Reviews

Hello!

For the first post today I have a bunch of smaller reviews from netgalley reads over the last couple of months, which are mostly a mixture of YA and Fantasy this time around, with a couple of others in the mix.

*Disclaimer: I received an e-arc of these books from netgalley in exchange for an honest review*

***** *****

How to be Ace: A Memoir of Growing up Asexual – Rebecca Burgess

Genre: Memoir | Comics & Graphic Novels | LGBTQIA

Book Summary:

“When I was in school, everyone got to a certain age where they became interested in talking about only one thing: boys, girls and sex. Me though? I was only interested in comics.”

Growing up, Rebecca assumes sex is just a scary new thing they will ‘grow into’ as they get older, but when they leave school, start working and do grow up, they start to wonder why they don’t want to have sex with other people.

In this brave, hilarious and empowering graphic memoir, we follow Rebecca as they navigate a culture obsessed with sex – from being bullied at school and trying to fit in with friends, to forcing themself into relationships and experiencing anxiety and OCD – before coming to understand and embrace their asexual identity.

Giving unparalleled insight into asexuality and asexual relationships, How To Be Ace shows the importance of learning to be happy and proud of who you are.

Continue reading “Mini Reviews”