Mini Reviews

Hello!

TodayI’m here with a selection of smaller reviews from netgalley reads over the last couple of months, which are mostly fantasy, with a few others mixed in.

Disclaimer: I received an e-arc of these books from netgalley in exchange for an honest review

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Burying the Dead: An Archaeological History of Burial Grounds, Graveyards & Cemeteries – Lorraine Evans

Genre: Non-Fiction | History

Book Summary:

Deep in the heart of North Yorkshire, at a place called Walkington Wold, there lies a rather unusual burial ground, an Anglo-Saxon execution cemetery. Twelve skeletons were unearthed by archaeologists, ten without skulls, later examination of the skeletons revealed that their owners were all subjected to judicial execution by decapitation, one of which required several blows.

Similar fates have befallen other wretched souls, the undignified burial of suicides – in the Middle Ages, the most profound of sins – and the desecration of their bodies, go largely unrecorded. Whilst plague pits, vast cemeteries where victims of the Black Death were tossed into the ground, their bodies festering one on top of another, are only today betraying their secrets.

Although unpalatable to some, these burial grounds are an important part of our social heritage. They have been fashioned as much by the people who founded and used them, as by the buildings, gravestones and other features which they contain. They are records of social change; the symbols engraved upon individual memorials convey a sense of inherent belief systems, as they were constructed, adapted or abandoned depending on people’s needs.

Burying the Dead explores how these attitudes, practices and beliefs about death have undergone continual change. By studying the development of society’s funerary spaces, the author will reveal how we continue to reinforce our relationships with the dead, in a constant and on-going effort to maintain a bond with them.

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Mini Reviews

Hello!

For the first post today I have a bunch of smaller reviews from netgalley reads over the last couple of months, which are mostly a mixture of YA and Fantasy this time around, with a couple of others in the mix.

*Disclaimer: I received an e-arc of these books from netgalley in exchange for an honest review*

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How to be Ace: A Memoir of Growing up Asexual – Rebecca Burgess

Genre: Memoir | Comics & Graphic Novels | LGBTQIA

Book Summary:

“When I was in school, everyone got to a certain age where they became interested in talking about only one thing: boys, girls and sex. Me though? I was only interested in comics.”

Growing up, Rebecca assumes sex is just a scary new thing they will ‘grow into’ as they get older, but when they leave school, start working and do grow up, they start to wonder why they don’t want to have sex with other people.

In this brave, hilarious and empowering graphic memoir, we follow Rebecca as they navigate a culture obsessed with sex – from being bullied at school and trying to fit in with friends, to forcing themself into relationships and experiencing anxiety and OCD – before coming to understand and embrace their asexual identity.

Giving unparalleled insight into asexuality and asexual relationships, How To Be Ace shows the importance of learning to be happy and proud of who you are.

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Book Review: The Vela – Yoon Ha Lee, Becky Chambers, SL Huang, and Rivers Solomon

Hello!

Today I am reviewing what is probably my favourite Sci-Fi read for this year – The Vela. This is one that I stumbled across on netgalley and was intrigued enough to request, and I am so glad that I was approved, because I loved this book and I find myself already wanting to read it again.

*Disclaimer – I received an e-arc via netgalley in exchange for an honest review*

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Book Summary:

In the fading light of a dying star, a soldier for hire searches for a missing refugee ship and uncovers a universe-shattering secret.

Orphan, refugee, and soldier-for-hire Asala Sikou doesn’t think too much about the end of civilization. Her system’s star is dying, and the only person she can afford to look out for is herself.

When a ship called The Vela vanishes during what was supposed to be a flashy rescue mission, a reluctant Asala is hired to team up with Niko, the child of a wealthy inner planet’s president, to find it and the outer system refugees on board.

But this is no ordinary rescue mission; The Vela holds a secret that places the fate of the universe in the balance, and forces Asala to decide—in a dying world where good and evil are far from black and white, who deserves to survive?

Continue reading “Book Review: The Vela – Yoon Ha Lee, Becky Chambers, SL Huang, and Rivers Solomon”