Mini Reviews: Non-Fiction

Hello!

In the penultimate post for today’s netgalley catch-up, I’m sharing my mini reviews for some of the nonfiction I’ve read and requested in the last few months. Nonfiction is often what I dive into after a book hangover, as its the best way to clear the palate before diving into another SFF book.

“Disclaimer – I received an e-arc via netgalley for these in exchange for an honest review, all thoughts are my own.”

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Mini Reviews

Hello!

For my first mini reviews of 2021, I’m catching up a few stragglers from last year as well as some early reads this year. There is a mixture of non-fiction, historical fiction and fantasy, as well as children’s, YA and Adult in the mix.

Mini reviews will differ slightly from the longer reviews in that they will only receive a rating badge, rather than featuring a quote and highlighted aspect badge, otherwise these posts would end up even longer than they already are.

“Disclaimer – I received an e-arc via netgalley for these in exchange for an honest review, all thoughts are my own.”

Continue reading “Mini Reviews”

Mini Reviews

Hello!

TodayI’m here with a selection of smaller reviews from netgalley reads over the last couple of months, which are mostly fantasy, with a few others mixed in.

Disclaimer: I received an e-arc of these books from netgalley in exchange for an honest review

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Burying the Dead: An Archaeological History of Burial Grounds, Graveyards & Cemeteries – Lorraine Evans

Genre: Non-Fiction | History

Book Summary:

Deep in the heart of North Yorkshire, at a place called Walkington Wold, there lies a rather unusual burial ground, an Anglo-Saxon execution cemetery. Twelve skeletons were unearthed by archaeologists, ten without skulls, later examination of the skeletons revealed that their owners were all subjected to judicial execution by decapitation, one of which required several blows.

Similar fates have befallen other wretched souls, the undignified burial of suicides – in the Middle Ages, the most profound of sins – and the desecration of their bodies, go largely unrecorded. Whilst plague pits, vast cemeteries where victims of the Black Death were tossed into the ground, their bodies festering one on top of another, are only today betraying their secrets.

Although unpalatable to some, these burial grounds are an important part of our social heritage. They have been fashioned as much by the people who founded and used them, as by the buildings, gravestones and other features which they contain. They are records of social change; the symbols engraved upon individual memorials convey a sense of inherent belief systems, as they were constructed, adapted or abandoned depending on people’s needs.

Burying the Dead explores how these attitudes, practices and beliefs about death have undergone continual change. By studying the development of society’s funerary spaces, the author will reveal how we continue to reinforce our relationships with the dead, in a constant and on-going effort to maintain a bond with them.

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Norsevember Wrap- up

Hello!

I can’t believe that we’re already at the end of November! It comes with bittersweet feelings, because on one hand I can now thoroughly embrace the festive spirit – Christmas music is going on at work tomorrow!! – on the other, today is St Andrews Day and were it not the year of Covid I would be attending a Street Ceilidh, torch-lit procession and fireworks. I will however, be indulging in haggis, neeps and tatties and blast some Ceilidh music while I do so.

Tomorrow, I will be sharing my November wrap-up post and looking at what’s on for December. Today however is all about Norsevember, and will actually be my main post for the month as life (and my blasted knees) have got in the way and derailed most of my November plans.

Firstly a massive shoutout to Alex at Spells and Spaceships for organising this event, and for all his amazing posts over the month which have been a much needed bright spot. Also, thank you again for this lovely bookmark that I won from one of the giveaways.

Secondly, I managed to read all but one of the books from my Norsevember TBR, but hadn’t managed to review them yet, so below you will find those reviews (hence the fact that this is a veeeery long post). They turned out to be a mixed bag, with some that I absolutely adored and others I absolutely hated, and some snuck in that weren’t even on the TBR to start with (as is always the way, right?)

Posts:

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Mini Reviews

Hello!

For the first post today I have a bunch of smaller reviews from netgalley reads over the last couple of months, which are mostly a mixture of YA and Fantasy this time around, with a couple of others in the mix.

*Disclaimer: I received an e-arc of these books from netgalley in exchange for an honest review*

***** *****

How to be Ace: A Memoir of Growing up Asexual – Rebecca Burgess

Genre: Memoir | Comics & Graphic Novels | LGBTQIA

Book Summary:

“When I was in school, everyone got to a certain age where they became interested in talking about only one thing: boys, girls and sex. Me though? I was only interested in comics.”

Growing up, Rebecca assumes sex is just a scary new thing they will ‘grow into’ as they get older, but when they leave school, start working and do grow up, they start to wonder why they don’t want to have sex with other people.

In this brave, hilarious and empowering graphic memoir, we follow Rebecca as they navigate a culture obsessed with sex – from being bullied at school and trying to fit in with friends, to forcing themself into relationships and experiencing anxiety and OCD – before coming to understand and embrace their asexual identity.

Giving unparalleled insight into asexuality and asexual relationships, How To Be Ace shows the importance of learning to be happy and proud of who you are.

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Mini Reviews

Hello!

Today, I have a bunch of smaller reviews from netgalley reads over the last couple of months, which are mostly a mixture of YA and Non-fiction this time around.

*Disclaimer: I received an e-arc of these books from netgalley in exchange for an honest review*

*****

The Legend of Akikumo – Dani Hoots

Genre: Fantasy, YA

Book Summary:

Ketsueki would give anything to find out why her mentor Akikumo, the last wolf in Japan, abandoned her. He left her with other kitsune at the Inari Shrine, but she doesn’t fit in. And now the other kitsune are bullying her and saying Akikumo is dead.

After causing trouble for the hundredth time, the Inari, instead of punishing her, has given Ketsueki a task: she must find out what happened to Akikumo. She quickly agrees, not realizing the delinquent son of the shrine’s head priest must accompany her.

Will Ketsueki be able to make peace with a human? Or will her years of resentment make this partnership impossible?

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Mini Reviews

Hello!

Another bunch of smaller reviews today, some are netgalley reads (marked with a disclaimer) and a couple that I’ve picked up elsewhere.

                                                                         ***** ***** *****

The Black God’s Drums – P. Djèlí Clark, Channie Waites (Narrator)

Genre: Audiobook, Fantasy

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Book Summary:

In an alternate New Orleans caught in the tangle of the American Civil War, the wall-scaling girl named Creeper yearns to escape the streets for the air–in particular, by earning a spot on-board the airship Midnight Robber. Creeper plans to earn Captain Ann-Marie’s trust with information she discovers about a Haitian scientist and a mysterious weapon he calls The Black God’s Drums.

But Creeper also has a secret herself: Oya, the African orisha of the wind and storms, speaks inside her head, and may have her own ulterior motivations.

Soon, Creeper, Oya, and the crew of the Midnight Robber are pulled into a perilous mission aimed to stop the Black God’s Drums from being unleashed and wiping out the entirety of New Orleans.

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